Next

8 things to do on a weekend break in Krakow

Blog 6 of the best places for pizza in Rome
Date: 18 July 2019

6 of the best places for pizza in Rome

Share

Planning a trip to Rome? You’re in for a treat. From the awe-inspiring Colosseum to Vatican City, the Italian capital is bursting at the seams with history, culture and must-see attractions.

And then there’s the food. Home of creamy carbonara, sweet maritozzi buns and supplì (deep-fried rice balls), it’s a paradise for foodies.

Of course, no visit to Rome is complete without pizza. With pizzerias, fornos and trattorias at every turn, there’s no shortage of places to sink your teeth into a slice or two.

To be sure you’re getting the best pie in town, take a look at our (by no means exhaustive) list of places to find the perfect pizza in Rome.

1. Pizza by the slice: Forno Campo de’ Fiori

A slice of mushroom pizza folded in a brown wrapper
Get a slice to go at one of Rome’s most popular bakeries. Photo courtesy of TripAdvisor

A bustling bakery, Forno Campo de’ Fiori does a roaring trade in pizza al taglio (pizza by the slice). People queue round the block for a slice of their pizza bianca, (flatbread seasoned with salt, rosemary and olive oil). It’s a taste sensation.

If you prefer your pizza with a tomato base, they sell a mean pizza rosso (red pizza) too. Just say how much you want and you’re charged by the weight. A delicious option for lunch on-the-go.

Piazza Campo de’ Fiori, 22
€€€

2. Off the beaten track: Dar Poeta

Woman's hands holding a knife and fork, cutting into a cheese and vegetable pizza
Take a step off the beaten path and head to Dar Poeta for a dinner in Rome to remember. Photo courtesy of TripAdvisor

Unless you know about this rustic pizzeria in Rome’s hip Trastevere neighbourhood, you could walk right past it. But it’s well worth seeking out.

The pizza at Dar Poeta, which is made from yeast-free, slow-rise dough, and cooked in a wood-fired oven, is exceptional. The prices are very reasonable too.

As well as the usual selection of pizzas, served with crusts that are somewhere between wafer-thin Roman and thicker Neapolitan-style, it’s also famous for its trademark ricotta and Nutella calzone.

Tip: There’s a buzzing atmosphere at night, so it’s a great place for dinner. But get there early as they don’t take reservations.

Vicolo del Bologna, 45
€€€€

3. Something a bit different: La Pratolina

Close-up of a pinse romane flatbread topped with assorted vegetables and melted cheese
Try one of the tasty ‘pinse romane’ flatbreads at La Pratolina. Photo: © La Pratolina

Fancy something a bit different? Head to La Pratolina for a mouth-watering ‘pinse romane’. Inspired by an ancient Roman recipe, these oval flatbreads are made of wheat, rice, and soy flours. The dough is leavened for 48 hours, resulting in a light and airy crust.

Not only does it taste divine, it contains less calories, fat, and salt than an ordinary pizza, so you if you’re watching your treats while on holiday, you can enjoy your dinner guilt-free.

You’ll find all the classic toppings here, but the Roman, which is topped with boiled potatoes, porchetta, pepper and rosemary, is one of their specialties.

Whet your appetite with a plate of their mouth-watering pork croquettes for the ultimate Pratolina experience.

Tip: This is a great spot for a date-night dinner. If you’re visiting the Eternal City with your other half, take a look at our tips on the 10 most romantic things to see and do in Rome.

Via degli Scipioni, 248
€€€€

4. Experimental toppings: Bonci/Pizzarium

Rectangular pizzas with different toppings behind a glass counter
Try out some different toppings at Pizzarium. Photo: © Bonci

Known affectionately as the ‘Michaelangelo of Pizza’, revolutionary pizza chef Gabriele Bonci is renowned for making some of the most exciting pizza in Rome. Using the same kind of spelt that the ancient Romans used to make their bread, the dough is springy, light and delicious. And the toppings are inspired.

At Bonci’s pizza al taglio locales, such as Pizzarium, the flavours go far beyond the standard tomato, mozzarella, and basil, with experimental toppings that vary according to the season.

The menu changes daily and the toppings are impossible to predict, but expect to find playful permutations of cured meats, cheeses and seasonal produce.

The place is always heaving, but it’s well worth the wait. Once you’ve got your slice, join the throng on the pavement outside and eat it while it’s hot.

Via della Meloria, 43
€€€€

5. Gluten-free pizza: La Soffitta Renovatio

Margherita pizza on a wooden table next to a basil plant and a plate of buffalo mozzarella and cherry tomatoes on the vine
Order a Neapolitan pizza at La Soffitta Renovatio for a taste sensation. Photo: © La Soffitta Renovatio

Gluten intolerant? No problem. You can get your fill of pizza and pasta at La Soffitta Renovatio. A few minutes’ walk from the Vatican, it’s one of the top spots in the city for gluten-free grub.

Accredited by the Italian Celiac Association, this family-run restaurant takes food intolerances seriously. Gluten-free meals are cooked in a separate area to everything else and flags are added to the dishes to avoid cross-contamination.

The Margherita is exceptional, whether you’re gluten intolerant or not, and the traditional Neapolitan base is soft and pillowy. Don’t leave without trying the gluten-free tiramisu.

Chances are, you’ll pay this place more than one visit. Wear loose trousers.

Piazza del Risorgimento, 46/a
€€€

6. Great for kids: Trapizzino

Two hands, each holding up a Trapizzino with a different topping on either one
Take the kids for a popular pizza-sandwich hybrid at Trapizzino © Trapizzino

Pizza maker Stefano Callegari took Rome by storm in 2008 when he invented trapizzini from his tiny pizza joint in Testaccio. A hybrid of a pizza and a sandwich, they’re stuffed with all sorts of yummy fillings, from traditional pizza toppings to more unusual ingredients, like braised oxtail, cuttlefish, and tripe.

At 4 euros a pop, a trapizzino is a cheap and tasty way to stop your stomach rumbling. And it’s a great option for kids. There’s a dedicated children’s menu, consisting of a child-size trapizzino, a bottle of water, a homemade cookie, and a ‘surprise’ from ancient Rome.

For a little taste of heaven, choose the Genovese trapizzino, which contains shoulder of beef, red onion and black pepper.

Trapizzino has various locations in Rome
€€€

Get a slice of the action

Three pizzas in front of a fire in a wood-burning oven
Learn the tips and tricks of the trade with a pizza-making course in Rome

If you want to learn how to make your own pizza while in Rome, this 4-hour combo pizza and pasta cooking class will teach you everything you need to know. A professional chef will show you how to make Neapolitan pizza dough and cook it in a wood-fired oven. You’ll also learn how to make ten different pasta shapes. Best of all, the class will finish with an all-you-can-eat feast.

This experience is child-friendly so its a great option to keep the kids entertained on a rainy day in Rome.

Explore Rome, earn CashPoints

A bridge over the River Tiber at dusk, with St. Peter's Basilica against a pink sky in the background
Discover all the sights of Rome and earn CashPoints every step of the way with Norwegian Reward

If we’ve made you hungry to visit Italy, book your flights to Rome with Norwegian and you’ll be munching on Margherita before you know it.

With so many great restaurants, and with so many fabulous things to see and do, there’s no danger of you getting hungry or bored. The problem is fitting it all in. Save yourself time by pre-ordering a ‘skip-the-line’ ticket. It’ll enable you to bypass the queues for the attractions you want to see, leaving you with plenty of time to indulge in pizza.

Before booking anything, be sure to join Norwegian Reward. As a member, you’ll earn CashPoints on flights, hotels, and activities in Rome, which can be used to get discounts on your next foodie break with Norwegian.

Book flights to Rome

Book a hotel

Share
Next

8 things to do on a weekend break in Krakow